A Refreshing Perspective

The Lora M. Robins Speaker Series is an event I look forward to each year, especially this year’s session on “The Crisis of Urban Education” featuring Dr. Chris Emdin. Charged with leading the Virginia Department of Education’s efforts aimed at advancing equity, closing achievement gaps, and decreasing disproportionality in student outcomes – I was intrigued to hear from the professor who wrote the book For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood... and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education. In my work at the VDOE, we had recently received recommendations from The Taskforce to Diversify Virginia’s Educator Pipeline and held a statewide convening on minority teacher recruitment.

The timing was perfect. What could we learn from Dr. Emdin about delivering engaging and culturally relevant instruction that supports learning and success for students of color? All I can say is – I. Was. Not. Ready! Dr. Emdin was a refreshing perspective. His remarks were compelling, honest, inspirational, and provocative. Chris challenged our traditional thinking about teaching, and student learning. Reality Pedagogy needed a larger audience – and I knew just the forum.

We were in the early stages of planning a statewide conference on equity. I knew that we needed to incorporate Reality Pedagogy into our convening. LMR and the Robins Foundation were instrumental in making the connection that allowed us to secure Dr. Emdin as a keynote for the inaugural Virginia is for All Learners: Education Equity Summer Institute – a convening of more than 500 educators from across the Commonwealth. Our overarching goal was to explore the implications of institutional racism in public education and raise state discourse around policy and practices that positively affect equity outcomes for Virginia’s public school students (K-12). Our conference focused on public policies influencing equitable outcomes for students; how social-emotional learning and trauma-informed care are essential strategies to addressing achievement gaps; and finally, how educator preparation programs must engage in the equity conversation to affect student outcomes across the state.

I was so excited to bring Dr. Emdin to our conference where he was able to share his research and pedagogical practice with educators and education leaders from across the state. Chris made quite the impression on our conference attendees who shared their enthusiasm for #HipHopEd and #EdEquityVA all over social media. Many superintendents and school division leaders expressed appreciation.

While our work to advance education equity across the state continues, we have a new spark in our step thanks to Chris’ thoughtful keynote and ongoing support of our work. Kudos to LMR and Robins Foundation for bringing this outstanding scholar and practitioner to our attention!

Leah Dozier Walker, MPA
Director, Office of Equity and Engagement
Division of School Quality, Equity, and Instruction
Virginia Department of Education

A Growing Community of Collaboration

Leadership Metro Richmond (LMR) is proud once again to partner with the Valentine and the Capital Region Collaborative to select and honor Richmond History Makers. This partnership began in 2005 and continues to this day as an excellent example of community collaboration.

I am pleased to co-chair the Selection Committee with Mary Brown (LMR ‘14). This will be our second year to lead this process. We are fortunate and energized to work with our partners on this project – our CEO, Myra Smith (LMR ‘06), and Bill Martin (LMR ‘07 – best class ever!), Director of the Valentine.

Now, back to the word ‘collaboration.’ It’s a word we use frequently in the non-profit sector. It’s not a new idea or the latest trend in effective management. But, it’s a word that is taking on a new meaning in our regional community.

I (and many others) think we are at the beginning of a peak of public collaboration. The Mayor of the City of Richmond has created a new beginning with other jurisdictions. City officials are working more closely with appointed and elected officials in the counties of Henrico, Chesterfield, Goochland, and Hanover. Challenges in our community know no geographic bounds. For example, the East End of Richmond combats the same challenges as Eastern Henrico. Both areas need better school facilities and academic support, both need affordable and sustainable housing, and both need access to good jobs that pay a living wage.

Many of these issues require significant and long-term funding. Housing and schools are complex issues that require a mix of public and private funding. I am honored to work for the Community Foundation for a greater Richmond. We work closely with other funders - for example, the Robins Foundation and Richmond Memorial Health Foundation. Local foundations are collaborating with corporate funders – Altria, Bank of America, CarMax, and Genworth are among the many corporate leaders in this partnership.

Our regional nonprofit organizations are collaborating in exciting and efficient new ways. Silos of programming and activity are not as effective as solutions that address the multiple layers of needs for an at-risk child or adult in our community. CARITAS addresses both substance abuse and preparing adults for the workforce by collaborating with health providers and local employers. The Better Housing Coalition tackles both the need for affordable housing and an enhanced quality of life; as an example, their work involves partnership with the Children’s Home Society as they house young adults who are moving from the foster system to independent living. And, NextUp provides after-school activities for hundreds of middle school students in the City of Richmond. Their work involves collaborating on service delivery with approximately 35 other nonprofits, such as ART180, Blue Sky, the YMCA, and Communities in Schools.

Collaborators are front-runners for recognition, at least in my opinion. Think about this as you consider making a nomination for the History Maker Award, due by October 22. Please visit the History Makers website to learn more about the award categories, as well past recipients, many of whom are highly collaborative LMR graduates. The event will be held on March 12, 2019, at Virginia Union University.

Please join in this process or attend the event so that you too can participate in the growing collaboration in our region.

Scott Blackwell
Chief Community Engagement Officer
Community Foundation for a greater Richmond
LMR Class of 2007

A Bridge into Board Service

Recently, I celebrated my 15-year LMR class reunion. I and many of my classmates gathered to reminisce about our time together during the Fall of 2002 and Spring of 2003.  I was one of two classmates on the agenda asked to share how the experience had shaped us.

I pointed out how prior to LMR, I had no board service.  My classmate, Lee Reeves, was the Executive Director of a very successful nonprofit he started called Team UP Richmond.  During our graduation ceremony back then, Lee asked if I would serve on his board. I shared with him my reservations about having no prior board experience, but Lee said “Ken, you'll be fine”. That exchange started my career of servant leadership in the Richmond non-profit community and beyond.

Soon thereafter, Rita Ricks (LMR ’89), who had recommended LMR to me, also recommended me for the Board of the Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce; known today as ChamberRVA.  Rita later shared that when she originally mentioned my name, the leadership of the Chamber indicated that they had no idea who I was.  But once she stated I had just completed LMR, their eyes widened, and I was welcomed to the board.

Several other boards soon followed as news of my status as an LMR alumnus made the rounds.  Such that, when the then President of Old Dominion University nominated me to serve on the Board of my alma mater, there was plenty of board experience on my resume.  Appointment to the Board of Visitors of ODU by Governor Warner was the first of now 5 gubernatorial appointments.  Since 2003, in all, I’ve served on 20 boards; and have turned down numerous others in light of my day job.

LMR is the place where I learned the principles of facilitation and collaboration; where I learned a greater understanding of social issues of the Richmond region; and where I was first exposed to the concept of servant leadership.  All of these traits have become the foundation for my years of community involvement at a leadership level.  Participation in THE BEST CLASS EVER instilled the desire in me to leave the world a better place then how I found it.  John F. Kennedy once said, “Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other”.  Thanks to LMR, we learn how to lead.

Ken Ampy, Astyra Corporation
Class of 2003

From Immersion to Action

Maggie Walker Community Land Trust as a Solution to Neighborhood Gentrification

Many LMR Quest alumni no doubt recall that initial seminar day when participants first broke out into their “immersion groups” to analyze and report on a topic of general interest to the region.  Confronted with such broad subjects as “transportation” or “housing”, the first step was narrowing to something manageable.  As wet-behind-the-ears members of the (best!) Class of 2016, our group tackled the housing topic by drilling down on a very specific but innovative solution being brought to bear on the expansive affordable housing challenge our region faced.  The specific challenge was gentrification, i.e. the pricing out of existing residents due to rising home values, and the potential solution was the use of a “community land trust.”  Here, we figured, was something innovative worth spotlighting to our classmates.  We never could have predicted how quickly this nascent idea would blossom into one of the region’s most potent tools for affordable homebuying!

Since the last census, many neighborhoods across RVA have undergone growth and revitalization.  While this is good news, it can produce the side effect of placing an increased burden on existing residents.  Our rising rents and home purchase prices have decreased the supply of affordable housing, which is struggling to keep pace.  In the context of homebuying, a common affordability solution is to provide grants or forgivable/low-interest loans.  One limitation to this approach is that the benefit must be replicated each time a property changes hands, as there is no longer-term protection to preserve affordability, or more importantly, to prevent displacement.

The concept of a community land trust takes a different approach.  The CLT is typically a non-profit that acquires land and either constructs or rehabilitates homes in neighborhoods confronting a dramatic rise in property values.  When a CLT home is “sold” to a qualifying homebuyer for an affordable price, the CLT retains ownership of the land and imposes restrictions on the future sale of the property, including a resale formula that ensures future affordability on each successive sale.  This ensures that the benefit of the affordability is passed on into the future.

Around the same time as our Quest immersion research in 2016, a group of affordable housing thought-leaders convened to explore a possible CLT in RVA.  This effort stemmed in part from the seminal 2015 Housing the Richmond Region Report by the Partnership for Housing Affordability, closely affiliated with the Richmond Association of Realtors and its CEO, Laura Lafayette.  This group leveraged the expertise and commitment of pillars in the non-profit affordable housing community such as Metropolitan Richmond Habitat for Humanity, project:HOMES, and others, to strategize how to implement a CLT for this region.  Soon the Maggie Walker Community Land Trust was born!

What began as a glimmer of an idea has over time become an important tool in the effort to preserve affordability in neighborhoods undergoing acute home value appreciation.  The organization started small, beginning with the acquisition of a single parcel and groundbreaking on its construction of a new home in Church Hill on June 5, 2017.  Today, the MWCLT expects to acquire over fifty properties a year for the next several years.  There are several essential ingredients to the immediate success of the organization.

  • Controlling Acquisition/Construction Costs. For the model to succeed, the CLT must have an inexpensive means of acquiring land and constructing or rehabilitating residences.  Thanks to a partnership with the City of Richmond, the MWCLT has been designated as a land bank for the City’s formerly tax delinquent and City-owned vacant properties, offering an important pipeline of properties without the burden of significant acquisition costs.  This innovate approach marks the first combined CLT and land bank in the nation.  Likewise, partnerships with Habitat and Project:HOMES provide an affordable means of securing quality rehabilitation and construction on these parcels.
  • Funding Partners. Private partners such as the Virginia Credit Union and Bon Secours have provided essential support in the form of unrestricted operating funds to facilitate the acquisitions and construction, as well as other support.  Over the long term, cultivating a dedicated group of corporate and individual support will remain critical.
  • Professional Expertise. Since its inception, the MWCLT has relied upon the indispensable strategic guidance of HDAdvisors, its president, Bob Adams, and his team, who have set the organization on a path for sustainability.  Similarly, the MWCLT brought on Nikki D’Amado-Damery to serve as Community Coordinator, with an office located in Church Hill, one of the organization’s priority neighborhoods.

While our immersion group cannot claim any special impact on the MWCLT’s early efforts, our goal was to illuminate to our peers the depth of the gentrification challenge and the unrealized potential we saw in the CLT model.  The implementation of that model, which has expanded from Church Hill to Randolph to even 9 homes in Chesterfield, offers a compelling solution to a vexing problem facing many in our community.  While much remains to be done, the MWCLT and its partners deserve to be recognized as innovative leaders in the fight to preserve housing affordability in greater Richmond.

For more information about the Maggie Walker Community Land Trust, please visit their website at maggiewalkerclt.org.

Preston Lloyd, Williams Mullen
Class of 2016

Joining Forces for Tomorrow’s Leaders

As I take a moment to reflect on my career path, I am thankful for the opportunities that I have received. Opportunities to grow, try new things, and step out of my comfort zone. Throughout my formative years and into college, there was always an adult “pouring into my life.” My family cheered me on from the sidelines and my mentors gave me that extra push. As you think about your career, can you name the mentor(s) who encouraged you?

If you were able to name at least one person who served as your mentor/coach, consider yourself lucky. Unfortunately, not every person in their developmental years has the chance to cultivate relationships with instrumental figures like mentors. That reality led to Partnership for the Future (PFF) and Leadership Metro Richmond joining forces to help our future workforce. Founded in 1994, PFF began as a college access organization with the focus on preparing students with limited resources for the college process. Fast forward to 2014, PFF realized that we needed to ensure that our students were persisting through, graduating from college, and finding meaningful work experiences…that’s where LMR comes in.

The COACHES RVA program was created to help PFF students build their network of individuals who can help guide them through important transitions into adulthood. COACHES have been instrumental in assisting students with life challenges. For instance, a PFF graduate was recently faced with a severe situation where her lack of confidence (stemming from abandonment issues) and a lack of familial support led to her inability to focus on her school work. Ultimately, this student was placed on academic probation and forced to leave campus without a place to go. While PFF did all that we could for this bright student, it was the LMR Coach who had the biggest impact in connecting her with resources outside of college, helping her find a job and a place to stay, and even reengaging the college (since it was the Coach’s alma mater). Thanks to the diligence of this wonderful Coach, this young lady recently returned to school and now has another identified mentor on her campus. It is because of this Coach, that this young lady will be able to finish her college degree and create a better life for herself.

While not every coaching story will sound like this one, it is important to understand that you serving as a mentor, coach, and door opener can make all of the difference. You can help our region by ensuring that our next generation of talented leaders are connected to the right people locally and developed for further greatness. Mentor a child and become a part of the army of leaders working for the greater good of our young people.

Charleita Richardson
Class of 2008

Learnings from RVA Leaders

I am often teased about having a large network, that I know “everyone”. That is extreme, yet my life long adventures and engagements in RVA have yielded me linkages that are wide and diverse. The individuals, the leaders that I encountered over four decades in RVA provided me with my own personal leadership lab. I cannot remember all of the conversations I had with community leaders, but I do remember how they impacted me and the lessons learned from their actions and interactions. The following is one of many stories from my leadership lab.

ALMA MARIE

In 1977, I had the unique experience to engage with the new leaders in Richmond history. I was the intern for newly elected Councilwomen for the 8th district Claudette Black McDaniel and 3rd district Willie Dell, the first black female councilwoman. At that time, as a seventeen-year-old, I did not realize I was in the midst of history.

One of my roles as an intern was to attend council meetings. I would sit in the audience, chat with residents and take notes for the Councilwomen. At one meeting, I met Mrs. Alma Marie Barlow. As a resident of Fairfield Court, she saw an opportunity to bring about change and created the Richmond Tenants Association, giving a heighten and collective voice for residents living in public housing. On numerous occasions, she spoke during the council’s public comment period. Mrs. Barlow had a posture of confidence and influence as she shared with city council the needs of residents. As a teenager, I was shocked and disappointed to hear the whispers of leaders in the audience making comments, not on what she was saying, but how she was saying it. They focused more on the delivery of her message rather than the message itself. Did they not think what she had to say was important? Did their biases cause them to miss an opportunity to gain new knowledge and/or perspectives different than their own?

Four years later, while working on my degree in planning at VCU, I wrote a paper on public housing in Richmond. I wanted to include the voices of the tenants. I called Mrs. Barlow and she invited me into her home. We sat in her living room and talked for a few hours. I cannot say exactly what she said, but I remember feeling that the residents had a leader that believed in their community. I do remember being interrupted often by knocks on the door by neighbors who needed to talk to Mrs. Barlow. It was a visit that I think of often.

Mrs. Barlow touched many lives, she made a difference beyond the tenants of the public housing “courts”. In an interview with VA Lawyers Weekly, Henry McLaughlin, former CEO of Central Virginia Legal Aid Society was asked, “Who was your most important mentor and how did he/she impact your career?” He answered “Alma Marie Barlow, executive president of the Richmond Tenants (Association). She taught me that differences are important and should be respected, but that those things that bring us together are more important. She changed the way I’ve interacted with clients.”

After many years of speaking for and working for the rights of residents, Mrs. Barlow died in 1993. I am proud to say that she was a member of the Leadership Metro Richmond Class of 1990. Her work in RVA was recognized, including being named to the first class of the YWCA Outstanding Women Award recipients, just three years after creating the Tenants Association.

Upon her death, the Virginia General Assembly agreed in a House Joint Resolution that “Whereas , never one to suffer injustice silently, Alma Barlow rose to prominence as the head of the tenants association and became an exceptional influential and respected advocate for the rights of the less fortunate and Whereas, her rise from humble beginnings gave proof, in the words of Governor Wilder, to the notion that a person’s ability to bring about meaningful change is not dictated by personal wealth or status in life, but by a genuine concern for the common good”

I am glad I was listening, not whispering. I would have missed history!

Myra Goodman Smith
LMR President & CEO
Class of 2006

“In This Place, They Have a Face”

They are the faceless individuals you don’t see standing on the corner when you’re stopped at a traffic light. They don’t want to work. They are shiftless and lazy. They are to be avoided. They are to be mistrusted. They are to be arrested for trespassing, for panhandling, for bizarre behavior. They are dirty and dangerous. They are the homeless.

Sadly, this has been and remains the opinion of many Richmond residents. The reality is that being homeless is a lonely and scary experience—ask anyone who has faced the frightening reality of being one paycheck, one sickness, one injury or accident away from losing one of life’s most basic needs: shelter. The challenge is to create environments which foster enriched, stable and healthy lives, instead of ignoring these individuals and viewing them as a malignancy.

In 2000, a group of nine LMR rookies came together to form and to storm. Back in the day, teams selected their LMR project from proposals submitted by local nonprofits. Team TGFKAX as we were known, began to educate ourselves about community perceptions surrounding homelessness and specifically those related to a community housing environment which offered shelter in South Richmond to eight chronically homeless individuals with severe mental illness. What we learned was transformational for us and what we were able to accomplish was transformational for the nonprofit with whom we were partnered, The Daily Planet. Team TGFKAX spent our next 10 months working in collaboration to address and resolve some of those misconceptions.

We were fortunate to convince HUD to reserve federal funds for the re-establishing and relocating of a special and unique transitional housing facility/program (Safe Haven). The program once located at 316 East Clay Street was forced to move to make way for the Richmond Convention Center expansion. After meeting individually with the Mayor (now Senator Kaine) as well as all district representatives AND confronting attitudes of NIMBY from many in the community, the team was instrumental in getting the approval of City Council for a special use permit allowing a new facility to be built.

Daily Planet Health Services continues to embrace innovative ways to motivate homeless clients out of their disenfranchisement by redeveloping the social inclusion and community they have lost. After 18 years, how would I know this? Because two members of that LMR team are still involved today! One of our team members joined the board following our graduation, and I became a volunteer on a board committee (thanks to that board member reminding me that we always “make a good team” and that I had a skill set that was desperately needed). After serving on the board fund development committee for 5 years, I received a recruitment call asking if I’d consider becoming a “Planeteer” (employee) and devote my fund-raising skills full-time on behalf of the organization.

Fast forward eleven years, that board member and I are still inspired to advocate as a team for the at-risk populations served by Daily Planet and still applying the lessons learned during our LMR experience.

Maureen Neal, CFRE
COO, Advancement, The Daily Planet
LMR Class of 2001

Programming notes:

The title of this blog post refers to Safe Haven and was also the title of the poem written specifically for our 2001 LMR project presentation.

The photo above is from the cover of Daily Planet’s 2000-2001 Annual Report reveals some of the City Council representatives we worked so hard to convince they were making the right choice. Recognize any recent VP candidates?

Richmond and the World

As a relatively new resident of Richmond I became a proud member of Leadership Metro Richmond 2017 in order to link local and international interests from my position as Dean of International Education at the University of Richmond. From the first day I found partnership with LMR members on issues highly relevant to my work, immigration and education foremost among them. Thanks in part to the awareness LMR brought, my first Memorandum of Understanding was not with an international partner, as would be customary, but with Virginia Commonwealth University to have our faculty work together in places of mutual interest, so far including Mexico, Guatemala, and South Africa.

Another strong partnership from LMR turned out to be with the ever-resourceful LMR President and CEO Myra Goodman Smith. UR created Danish Week in November 2017 to celebrate our longstanding student exchanges with Denmark and to have our campus and community learn about another culture together. The Danish Embassy got on board in a big way. Myra Smith met with Lars Bo Mueller, the number two at the Danish Embassy, to discuss how LMR models civic engagement and to compare Richmond and Copenhagen in several dimensions.

His Excellency Lars Gert Lose, Danish Ambassador to the United States, on this first visit to Richmond was interested in meeting with Mayor Levar Stoney. Myra facilitated our connection with the Mayor’s office and the meeting was very productive. The two leaders discussed sustainable energy and the challenges of transportation. The Embassy car pulled up to City Hall immediately by the new RVA Bike Share racks, so things got off to a good start: Copenhagen has been named the world’s friendliest city for cycling.

Both officials from Denmark tweeted about their positive impressions of Richmond and shared a flood of images from their visit to the city and the UR campus. The Danish Ambassador was so impressed with his first visit to Richmond that he returned two weeks later with his family.

Myra and Haywood Spangler, as well as the helpful staff of LMR, had earlier offered strong support for our group project on immigration when we decided to show a film on the UR campus and to host a panel discussion of local experts who work with immigrants, several of them LMR alumni. It was the best-attended event of the year for my office.

All told, I feel that my world grew both locally and internationally by virtue of the year invested in LMR. Our group on immigration still meets to catch up on local issues and to advance our shared belief in Richmond as an international city, usually over dinner at a restaurant owned by an immigrant. And my staff is better integrated with Richmond, having attended the Richmond Region Tourism’s “I Am Tourism” training program to which I was alerted through LMR. We are now better able to represent our city to the world!

Martha Merritt
Class of 2017

CLICK HERE for more information on the next “I Am Tourism” workshop to be held by Richmond Region Tourism from 8:00am – 12:30pm on March 14, 2018.

It’s Time for a New Word

As we begin 2018, we will hear announcements from Oxford Dictionary, Merriam-Webster and other credible sources about the most important word from 2017.  We do not have agreement among the experts as to the ultimate word of the year; however, reviewing the top words on their respective lists does remind us about the tone of our society, both nationally and globally, during the past year.

Locally, a small group of leaders in the nonprofit and public sectors spent some time talking about words last year too:  words that we habitually use in speeches, meetings and grant applications.  More specifically, the words and terminology we use to describe the people who we help.   We challenged ourselves about the tone and messages relayed by the use of certain words.  The conversations were uncomfortable, yet necessary.  We all agreed that it is time for a new word.

In an era where we are intentional about highlighting the assets of all members of our community, it feels antiquated to refer to large segments of our community as disadvantaged or underprivileged.  Although those terms might have been appropriately descriptive at some point in the past, we now have a more evolved understanding of the damage that can be caused to the psyche of a child, or even an adult, by labeling them as “less than” or “under” the rest of us.  We need to find more respectful terminology.

I made up my own litmus test to confirm that it is time to retire those words from my vocabulary.  I imagine standing in front of a room facing a crowd of people who need the services that I have to offer. Then I assess if I would feel any discomfort, or if I would think that I sounded condescending, if I looked them in their eyes and called them disadvantaged or underprivileged.  I realized that I would not be able to call them by either word to their faces.  Therefore, I will not do it behind their backs.  I am now trying to use phrases like “children with untapped potential” or “individuals who are struggling financially.”  Yes, these are more words, but they pass my litmus test.

I encourage LMR members and all of our community leaders to be mindful of your word choice.  I am hopeful that the local conversations about changing the words we use to describe the people we help will continue and broaden to include more community leaders in 2018.  The time is right.

Reggie Gordon
Class of 2002

Data Makes a Difference

Just prior to Thanksgiving I led the Homeward staff in hosting our 11th annual Project Homeless Connect (PHC). This event matches clients with volunteers in a partnership to connect adults experiencing homelessness to as many on-site services as possible in one day. This year at PHC we saw over 400 volunteers connect 552 people from our community to services offered by nearly 50 providers in areas such as health, housing, dental, employment, and benefits.

As Executive Director of Homeward and an LMR Member (Class of 2011), I understand the value of connecting and educating community leaders to serve the greater community. One idea our organization would like to share with community leaders, is the importance of data to drive impact and achieve results. To best serve the needs of our community we need to listen but we also need to observe and analyze what the data tells us. Though our organization’s process of data collection, analysis, and responsive planning, we continue to reimagine how we can use Project Homeless Connect to collectively meet the needs of people experiencing homelessness. Our recent work revealed that 80% of people experiencing homelessness are unemployed or underemployed. In response to this data we added new employment service providers to PHC and continue to build partnerships with workforce development organizations throughout the region.

One of our upcoming events that provides community-level data on homelessness is our winter Point-in-Time count. This periodic count of people experiencing homelessness in Greater Richmond helps Homeward, our partners, and community volunteers understand the changing nature of homelessness in our region. The data collected from this event is compiled both locally and nationally to inform programs, planning, and funding. You can see first-hand how we collect the data that informs our work by volunteering at our winter Point-in-Time count. Join us in our efforts to prevent, reduce and end homelessness, but also use this as an opportunity to think about how your own organizations and businesses can collect and better utilize data. For more information about this event, please contact our Community Engagement Coordinator Michael Rogers at mrogers@homewardva.org.

Kelly King Horne
Class of 2011