The LMR Blog

Communities Need Constructive Conversation

Avoidance. Having conversations that challenge our beliefs, values, biases and perceptions is seen by many as stressful. Who is looking for more stress? Some of the most committed community leaders I know will step away from a group conversation of key importance if they believe it will lead to nowhere or cause an emotional debate. Many go silent. Have you heard the statement, “I just can’t go there?” If you are truly committed to creating change in our communities, you must be willing to step out of your comfort zone.

Since our beginning, LMR has encouraged dialogue amongst our community leaders by creating a “safe space” for open and honest conversations that reflect a myriad of diverse perspectives which often do not appear to stand on the same side of the issue. However, no issue has just two sides. The conversation should not be about right or wrong, instead it should increase our understanding about each other and the experiences that inform our values, priorities, and opinions. It is through listening to others that we can elevate our levels of personal knowledge to start us down a path towards collaboration and problem-solving.

Social media has provided a variety of digital platforms on which individuals now feel safer, more confident and empowered to share their opinions with the world. However, while absent from digital communications, voice tone, physical gestures and body language play an important role in how we communicate with one another in person. They reveal emotion and passion which add depth to words, thus building deeper understanding. In this digital age, it is important that we take these conversations offline and sit face-to-face with one another for these difficult but necessary interactions. This could be about anything from politics to religion to monuments…whatever is weighing heavy on the hearts and in the minds of the community around us.

Next Tuesday LMR will host a facilitation training for members, where they can learn the tools necessary to manage open and honest group dialogue. What are tactics to alleviate tension in the room? What do you do when one person is dominating the conversation? How do you keep the conversation on topic? These are just a few of the questions we will address with Jonathan Zur (LMR ’08), President & CEO of the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities.

Over the holiday weekend as you converse with your loved ones, take note of the way you converse with one another and consider if your approach to those conversations mirrors how you converse outside of the home in your day-to-day interactions. Imagine the possibilities if everyone would listen with the same interest and intent to understand as you do with your loved ones. At LMR, we are thankful for the opportunity to strengthen ties and build understanding in our communities. We are thankful for the dedication and passion our members have for this region and excited to engage with the future leaders they are influencing every day.

Myra Goodman Smith
Class of 2006
President & CEO, Leadership Metro Richmond

What We Give

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” – Winston Churchill

With Giving Tuesday just a few weeks away, we would like to highlight how one of our members has chosen to uplift the importance of giving back to the community by honoring exceptional volunteers who support a variety of worthy causes throughout the region at their annual “Carreras Gives Thanks” event. Rejena Carreras (LMR ’93) expressed to us on a call earlier this week that “LMR’s mission of inclusiveness and making a difference in the community is also a part of the mission of Carreras Jewelers.” Below, we asked Rejena to provide some inspiration for this Giving Tuesday (November 29, 2017) by sharing with us what motivated her to create the “Carreras Gives Thanks” awards:

As Carreras Jewelers celebrates our 50th year we are keenly aware that we would not be celebrating this golden anniversary without our loyal customers and our amazing community.

It has always important to our company to give back to the community that gives so much to us. Four years ago, we started “Carreras Cares”. During the month of December we invited 12 non-profits that we either had relationships with as a store or that were organizations my employees personally supported, to each nominate a volunteer that went “above and beyond” for their organization for us to honor. The volunteers were invited to come in during store hours where we showered them with excitement, honored them with a piece of jewelry, and snapped pictures for our social media.

The volunteers were appreciative but my staff did not feel that it was enough. My staff wanted to be able to spend more time with the volunteers and hear more about why they were nominated. But, as many of us know, the holiday season in a retail store is hectic.

Two years ago, we started “Carreras Gives Thanks”, a way to continue honoring volunteers and giving them the recognition and appreciation they deserve. But instead of inviting the honorees to come in individually throughout December, we combined it into a single fun cocktail event in the beginning of November.

This year, on November 1st, we honored 11 volunteers from 11 different non-profits: HandsOn Greater Richmond, The Links Incorporated, Richmond (VA) Chapter, Big Brothers Big Sisters, The Reinhart House, Sheltering Arms, Richmond Triangle Players, VCU Massey Cancer Center, Children’s Hospital Foundation, Thrifty Sisters, Make-A-Wish Greater Virginia, and SPARC. Volunteers, their friends and family, and members from the organizations enjoyed an evening of celebrating each other’s achievements. Carreras’ staff members read “bios” about each volunteer written by their organization, while everyone cheered and clapped. Each volunteer was presented with a yellow rose and a piece of diamond jewelry from Carreras.

“Carreras Gives Thanks” has become one of the staff members’ and my favorite events. We enjoy meeting everyone who attends and recognizing the amazing and dedicated local volunteers. We look forward to continuing this event for years to come!

Rejena Carreras
Class of 1993

The Quest for Public Leadership

In 2005, I became a member of Leadership Metro Richmond because I believed that leadership was more than an ascension to a position or title. I believed that it was the essence of being an active part of a network of people who cared about and accepted the responsibility of the future of the City of Richmond and surrounding jurisdictions.

Through our leadership quest, we embrace being an effective part of leadership in a diversified group with varying and sometimes opposing interests and beliefs. However, we came away from our quest understanding that leadership is about having the personal resolve to be inclusive rather than exclusive. Leadership Metro Richmond is a tremendous resource comprised of Richmond’s most talented network of individuals who care and want to be a part of community solutions which we so desperately need.

When I think about Richmond, I think about our LMR family which represent the public and private sector of our community. When seeking individuals for projects, councils and board appointments, LMR provides access to a vetted compendium of talented capable individuals.

Most recently, the Office of Minority Business Development needed several individuals to become members of the Mayor/Council appointed Emerging and Small Business Advisory Board. As a member of LMR, it was a natural and first choice resource in soliciting individuals who might be interested in serving in this capacity because the overall mission of the organization is clear. Preparing leaders and offering them opportunities to lead in RVA and surrounding areas! A big THANK YOU to Myra Smith and her staff for continuing to find and provide the best leadership talent that Richmond Region has to offer!

Angelia Yancey
Class of 2005

Legacy of Leaders

Every fall as we usher in a new class of community leaders, we establish a theme for the year ahead to guide not just our current class members but alumni of the program as well as the community at large. This theme appears on the cover of our printed member directory and influences the direction of programming for the year. In FY2017 we focused on “Leading Responsibly,” which requires staying informed and continuously learning. We looked for innovative ways to update our community leaders on understanding the needs of those they serve while considering what means the most to them and the issues we face. Events ranged from an update on the riverfront plan from James River Association as we paddled along the James River, to a courageous conversation with Linda Hancock from The Well at VCU around the effects of Heroin and Prescription Narcotics in our communities. Our keynote for the Spring Luncheon was a moderated discussion between LMR members VA Senator Jennifer McClellan (D) and VA Delegate Chris Peace (R) around how to lead responsibly as elected officials by bridging the partisan divide.

As we launch into FY2018, our theme of focus for the year is the “Legacy of Leaders.” Respected leadership expert John Maxwell stated, “The greatest legacy a leader can leave is having developed other leaders. Develop them as widely and as deeply as you can.” LMR selects a group of diverse individuals each year for the purpose of enhancing their knowledge and developing their abilities to be impactful community leaders. We then encourage them to become engaged by modeling the way for those that will follow. This year we identified a number of families that exist within our membership; parents and children who decades apart felt led to go through our Leadership Quest program and connect to a network of diverse community leaders in our region.

In a very unique case, we found a husband, wife, and daughter who all went through the LMR journey in 1989, 1992, and 2012 respectively. They inspired one another into a life of service and leadership, and continue to inspire those around them to this day. The daughter of the family was just appointed to serve on the LMR board of directors and her mother previously served as chairman of the board in 2006. It’s not just our children who are watching, but it is also our spouses, siblings, parents, neighbors, friends, and in the age of social media, it is even complete strangers. As LMR President and CEO Myra Goodman Smith often says, “all eyes are on you” as we work towards a better region, and hopefully your example will encourage others to join in and continue this work for the sake of future generations.

Are we prepared?

This past February we cancelled an event titled Convening Leaders: Emergency Preparedness. Our intent was to bring together LMR members with those serving in Fire & Emergency Services alongside the Central Virginia Emergency Management Alliance (CVEMA) to discuss what community leaders should be prepared to do in case of a major emergency in the Richmond region. This event was cancelled as a result of low registration but after the recent devastation from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma we would like to bring this topic forward once again and ask, are you ready?

An evacuation of the Virginia coastline would send many people to and through the Richmond region. What resources do you have available to potentially support evacuees? How could you step up to the challenge and set an example for future leaders to follow? Should the Richmond region also be evacuated, where will you go and how will you get there? Which of your neighbors may need assistance and how would you help?

To learn more about your locality’s emergency plan, visit the
CVEMA website and click on your locality. There you will find information on how to contact your local emergency management team as well as more information on your locality’s emergency management program. Be sure to look for links to their social media pages and sign up forms for their local notification system. Get ahead of the storms, and for the safety of your loved ones create and communicate your own emergency plan today.

What we can learn from Hurricane Harvey

Is it true that hard times ignite great leadership? As community leaders, we must serve first and then lead. Prime example: Houston furniture store owner Jim "Mattress Mack" McIngvale opened the doors of his Gallery Furniture stores up to Hurricane Harvey evacuees in the days leading up to the one of the busiest weekend’s in retail (Labor Day Weekend). Mack sacrificed this past holiday weekend’s sales to continue to serve those in need of shelter and meals after being displaced from their homes by the storm. In the spirit of our own theme this year “A Legacy of Leaders,” Mack was quoted in an interview with CBS News as stating the reason for his generosity was simply, “This is what my parents would have done.”

Offering the resources at your disposal to uplift those around you in a time of crisis should not be exception, but the norm. For some, it’s financial resources and spheres of influence. For example, comedian Kevin Hart issued the Hurricane Harvey Relief Challenge to his friends in entertainment via social media, which led to multiple $25,000 donations towards hurricane relief efforts. Houston Texans’ J.J. Watt has encouraged the sports communities (players and fans alike) to give, raising over $4 million for hurricane relief. Houston Rockets’ Clint Capela used the power of social media to report emergency situations and help get quicker assistance to those falling victim to the rising waters. In community leadership, community is key. We can accomplish more together than we can apart.

Locally, many Richmonders stepped up to the plate by both traveling down to the Texas for physical assistance but also using their resources here at home to raise funds for relief efforts. Patrick McKann of Glen Allen gathered a group last week to go down and rescue horses and livestock stranded in the floodwaters. Jack Brown’s Beer and Burger Joint on Grove Avenue donated 100% of their profits last week (and through the holiday weekend) to the American Red Cross. We applaud these individuals and businesses as well as the many other local efforts continuing to provide support to the hurricane relief. There is much to do in the aftermath of the storm and it will take a lot of time and resources. It is important that we continue to think of south Texas as their cleanup efforts have only just begun.

Looking for ways you can help south Texas? CLICK HERE for a recent article from ABC News on how, when, and what to give.

Charlottesville’s Call to Action

People often feel compelled to take swift action after events of enormous impact, such as what took place in Charlottesville over the weekend.  That demonstration of divisive behavior fueled by hatred was seen and heard around the world.  This is bigger than a single community, a state, or even our nation.  Hate rooted in unfounded prejudice has created a long history of battles all over the globe and that war continues.  So what do we do as community leaders?

After watching several news reports, reading the chatter on social media, and talking with family, friends, co-workers, and neighbors it is clear that there is a lot of blame thrown around and not enough conversation getting to the roots of issues.  Historically there have been decisions made based on biases and gaps in access of all kinds that continue to divide us (education, economic prosperity, healthcare, basic social services).  Those gaps have led to an even greater divide in communication, which has led us to a place of misunderstanding.

Leadership Metro Richmond (LMR) was created to be a catalyst to close those gaps in the Richmond region. Tiffany Jana and Matthew Freeman wrote in their recent book, Overcoming Bias: Building Authentic Relationships Across Differences, "Leadership Metro Richmond offers exactly the type of opportunity for bias reduction that contact theory suggests."  Each annual LMR class is a group that reflects the diversity in race, gender, profession, industry, and economic status across our region.  We bring together diverse leaders to broaden perspectives and connect those who are working towards the same goal of a better and brighter future for our communities.   However, while we continue on that mission today, our annual program is just the beginning.  We continue to urge our members/graduates to take the knowledge, experience and connections they have to create positive impact. We want them to keep building bridges of understanding and engage in inquiry to heighten their own understanding.

This fall we will host a facilitation training for our members through the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities so that the tough conversations we are able to have within our membership can continue outside of our doors.  We want our community leaders to not only talk to each other, but also facilitate challenging conversations in their own communities.  We desire for our members to continue to push for diversity and inclusion in leadership so that many voices are present at the table.  Encourage diversity within mission driven and public service boards and councils.  We envision a future where we can look around at those with decision making power and smile with pride at the fact that they reflect the culture, best interests, and values of many.